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In light of public opinion, shaped by cultural and religious traditions, these public morality and public order-based laws have been used against LGBT people as well as anyone who supports these attitudes.The best known case of possible homosexuality in ancient Egypt is that of the two high officials Nyankh-Khnum and Khnum-hotep.The impact of these laws on gay and bisexual men were brought to the world's attention by the Human Rights Watch.It was during this time that the Human Rights Watch published a report on the laws used by the Egyptian government to criminalize homosexuality, the history of the laws, use of torture against gay and bisexual men by the police, and how such laws violate international human rights standards.This crackdown also saw the "Public Order and Public Morals" code being increasingly used to criminalize the sexuality of gay and bisexual men.The code, originally enacted in the 1990s to punish westernized students and liberal intellectuals, was now being used to punish gay and bisexual men.The Cairo 52 were defended by international human rights organizations such as Human Rights Watch, and Amnesty International.However, they had no organized internal support, pleaded innocent, and were tried under the state security courts.

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Their lawyer asked that the charges be dropped because homosexuality was not a crime, but the judge refused on the grounds that two men had in fact "offended" religious and moral standards.

Both men lived and served under pharaoh Niuserre during the 5th Dynasty (c. Nyankh-Khnum and Khnum-hotep each had families of their own with children and wives, but when they died their families apparently decided to bury them together in one and the same mastaba tomb.

In this mastaba, several paintings depict both men embracing each other and touching their faces nose-on-nose.

Ancient Egyptian documents never clearly say that same-sex relationships were seen as reprehensible or despicable.

No ancient Egyptian document mentions that homosexual acts were set under penalty. During most of the rule of Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian government did not support LGBT-rights legislation at home and objected to attempts, starting in the 1990s, to have the United Nations include LGBT-rights within its human rights mission.

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