Updating the video card drivers

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There’s more chance of breaking something than anything else, so if everything on your PC is working just fine, you can skip the driver updates for the most part.

There’s a notable exception to this rule, of course.

Off the Shelf PC If you’re running an off-the-shelf PC or laptop and haven’t reloaded Windows manually, chances are good that most of your drivers are already using the manufacturer’s approved drivers.

This includes things like chipset, motherboard, sound card, and the like.

If you’re looking for a speed boost, updating your drivers to the latest version isn’t a magical speed enhancement that will suddenly remove the need to upgrade a slow PC.

If you’re upgrading from one version of a driver to another version, chances are good that the only things included in those updates are bug fixes for specific scenarios, and maybe some very minor performance increases.

Though you may have a basic understanding of what security updates and performance enhancements entail, you may be less familiar with drivers.

If there are driver updates available, view and install them – a restart of your computer may be required, so be sure to save all work and close any open applications.

In Windows 10, you can find Windows Update simply by running a search from the Start menu (simply type it in the search field).

Essentially, if you’ve got an AMD/ATI or NVidia video card, and you’re using the built-in Windows drivers, that’s a great time to When you first get a new PC, reload Windows on an old PC, or build a new PC, you’re going to want to make sure that you are using the correct drivers.

It’s not so much that you’ll need to keep the drivers updated to the very latest version all the time, it’s that you don’t want to be using some generic driver when you could be using the real driver.

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